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Dog

My dog is panting a lot and has diarrhea.

Resolved • Response time 1 minute

26 Aug 2021

My dog is panting a lot and has diarrhea.
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26 Aug 2021

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Dog Specialist's response
26 Aug 2021
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

Hi, JACustomer. I have been a Veterinary Nurse for over 15 years and I'm happy to help. Please stand by while I have a chance to type.

26 Aug 2021
Dog Specialist's response
26 Aug 2021
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

Any changes to the diet recently including new food, human food, new treats, etc?

Any vomiting?

Any blood in the diarrhea?

How old is your companion?

Did the panting start with the diarrhea?

26 Aug 2021
Customer reply
26 Aug 2021
He did get into my sisters dogs food but she has eaten it before and not had this problem.
26 Aug 2021
Customer reply
26 Aug 2021
No blood as of yet in the diarrhea she is 2 years old
26 Aug 2021
Customer reply
26 Aug 2021
The panting starts when she needs to go out and stops once she has gone diarrhea
26 Aug 2021
Dog Specialist's response
26 Aug 2021
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse

If she's had a recent diet change like eating a different dog food, this is likely to be the culprit. This can cause not only the diarrhea but also the panting before she goes to the bathroom (this tells us that she's experiencing pain). The cause of the symptoms here could be colitis caused by eating the other dog's food to pancreatitis (as she is showing signs of pain). Ideally, they do need to see a vet for diagnostics and treatment. Failing this, I can give you some steps to take at home to help your companion’s stomach feel better and help to restore their appetite back to normal without digestive upset. However, if you do not see a marked improvement from your pet or you see worsening of symptoms, they absolutely must be examined by a veterinarian ASAP. If you need help finding a location that can see your pet (even just to keep on hand), I can help. I’ll need you to provide your location as the website does not give us this.

It often helps to give medication to calm the stomach and a bland diet with higher fiber a few hours later once the medication has been given time to work. This can help to reduce the instance of nausea/vomiting, restore/improve the appetite, avoid or address changes in the stool, help to move ingested items through the GI tract, etc.

You can give regular pepcid (famotidine) every 12-24 hours if no other medications are being given that we haven’t discussed. This should help with GI symptoms. You can find the dosing information available here: https://www.petcarerx.com/medication-guides/famotidine-for-pet-stomach-ulcers/1116 For this, you can visit any human pharmacy and buy the OTC brand name Pepcid, or you can use the cheaper, off-brand “famotidine” that’s available. If your companion is avoiding taking medication, you will likely need to use a pilling technique like this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-P6NfbxeLX0 (this video is of a dog as it shows the finer details of how to complete the action, this method can be used in dogs, cats and other mammals needing oral medications). Be sure to give a few teaspoons of water following any dry pilling to help flush the pill down to the stomach. [Note: once symptoms have resolved for at least 48 hours, please discontinue the famotidine.]

2 hours after you have given a dose of famotidine, the time needed for the medication to begin working, you can offer a small amount of bland diet. To make the bland diet, you’ll combine white or brown rice, boneless, skinless chicken breast and sufficient water for cooking in a stock pot (note: if your companion is allergic to chicken you can use a protein source they can have such as ground turkey, a filet of salmon, etc). Aim for 75% chicken and 25% rice by weight. Avoid skin and bone. Use no salt, butter, oils, spices or other enticing additives. Boil on medium until it turns to mush and the meat is easily flaked. To avoid nausea, start with small amounts to begin with and offer the amount every 2-4 hours. A few teaspoons to start is typically sufficient and you can work your way up every 2-4 hours in incremental increases until you’re sure no vomiting will be seen. If your companion requires a more palatable food, try using or adding in pureed baby food in chicken, turkey and similar flavors. Avoid those that contain onion or garlic in the ingredient panel. You want to work up to feeding exclusively until at least 3 days following the resolution of symptoms. After this, work on slowly switching back to the regular food that your companion typically eats over a 10 day period. My recommendation is a 10% switch every day. Day 1: 10% new food, 90% old food; Day 2: 20% new food, 80% old food; Day 3: 30% new food, 70% old food, etc. This slow switch process should minimize any risk of GI upset from changing food.

I would be happy to take a look at any photos or video submitted to our chat. I can also help you find a vet (be sure to share your location since I don’t know where you are), if needed.

If finances are tight, I would highly recommend looking into both financial aid and financing options. Organizations like these make it possible for owners to fund an expensive procedure even if they cannot personally afford it at that time. With financing, you pay the amount back to the financing company BUT with financial aid the bill is paid for and you are NOT expected to pay the amount back. I also want to mention that many of the companies listed below work primarily with cats and dogs but will also consider helping exotics and pocket pets, as well, depending on need. If you don’t need the links now, it may be beneficial to keep them for the future and for other pets in the household. You can find vets open in your area here: https://www.petflight.com/vet_clinics. Here are some links to get you started:

1) Red Rover: https://redrover.org/relief/

2) Best friends: http://bestfriends.org/resources/financial-aid-pets

3) AVMA: https://www.avma.org/public/YourVet/Pages/Financial-assistance-for-veterinary-care-costs.aspx

4) HSUS: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html

5) PAWS: https://www.paws.org/cats-and-dogs/other-services/help-with-veterinary-bills/

6) Your dogs friend: http://yourdogsfriend.org/we-recommend/need-help-paying-vet-bills/

7) AFRP: https://www.animalfriendsrescue.org/financialassistance.html

8) Friends of pets: http://friendsofpets.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/FinAsstGuide201708.pdf

9) Speaking for Spot: http://speakingforspot.com/?p=Financial%20Assistance%20for%20Veterinary%20Care

10) Rainbows Bridge: https://www.rainbowsbridge.com/New_Beginnings/Pets_in_Need/Financial_Help.htm

11) AHF: https://www.animalhealthfoundation.net/index.html

12) Paws 4 a cure: http://www.paws4acure.org/askforhelp.php

13) O&B: http://www.onyxandbreezy.org/grant-application.html

14) Mosby: https://www.themosbyfoundation.org/apply-for-assistance/

15) BDF: http://www.browndogfoundation.org/process

16) Waggle: https://waggle.org/who-we-are/how-we-work/ (this company helps with veterinary-specific crowdfunding to their database of donors)

17) Financial aid for each of the US states: https://www.facebook.com/groups/444337726341699/permalink/955030605272406/

3 options for financing include www.carecredit.com, www.scratchpay.com and www.vetbilling.com. The first two companies have low interest APR rates (starting at 5%) and allow you to pay for a vet bill over 6-24 months. The last company offer a billing option for veterinary clients through automatic bank account drafting on a predetermined date at the time of service. Care Credit checks your credit but Scratch Pay only performs a soft inquiry (will not affect your credit score), making it a good choice for owners who may have been declined for Care Credit in the past.

If you are a veteran or active-duty, consider VETERAN PET FINANCIAL HELP available here:

https://www.spcai.org/get-involved/military-support/operation-military-pets/
https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/are-you-having-trouble-affording-your-pet

https://petsforpatriots.org/help-with-pet-veterinary-costs/

http://www.operationwearehere.com/Pets.html

If you are in Canada, try here: https://www.petcard.ca

Does this all make sense? Do you have any additional questions I can address today on this topic?

26 Aug 2021
Customer reply
26 Aug 2021
Thank you!
26 Aug 2021
Customer reply
26 Aug 2021
Can I ask you another question about my other dog please? She is itching I think because she keeps nibbling her sides and arms.
26 Aug 2021
Customer reply
26 Aug 2021
This has been going on for about 3 days and I can’t seem to figure out why.
26 Aug 2021
Dog Specialist's response
26 Aug 2021
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy

I'm afraid that I can only address one topic per thread, but I would be happy to assist under a new question listed at www.JustAnswer.com/dog

Customer rating:
PitRottMommy
PitRottMommy
Veterinary Nurse
Avg. question only CA$30
15 yrs experience in vet med, 8 in emergency med. Founder of a non-profit animal rescue
26 Aug 2021
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