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Dog

I'm pretty sure my female mother pitbull...

Resolved • Response time 2 minutes

13 Jul 2021

I'm pretty sure my female mother pitbull is pregnant by her son. She's 5 he's 2. Will the puppies be ok? Do vets consider abortions for these situations
JA: Is there anything else the Vet should know before I connect you? Rest assured that they'll be able to help you.
Customer: Both healthy.
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13 Jul 2021

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Dog Specialist's response
13 Jul 2021
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo
Veterinarian

Hello,
I'm Dr. Jo and I'm a veterinarian with more than 25 years of experience. I'm here to help you with your question about this situation for your dog. I'm so sorry this is happening and has you worried, but glad you're looking for the information you need.
If you prefer, I can also be available for a phone call. That can be very helpful especially if your question is complex.

Also, I frequently use a voice-to-text tool and it doesn't always get everything right.  If I send something that is confusing or doesn't make sense, please let me know.

Can you please tell me how far along she might be?

Thank you.

-Dr. Jo

13 Jul 2021
Customer reply
13 Jul 2021
I'm not positive. But they were in heat beginning of June
13 Jul 2021
Dog Specialist's response
13 Jul 2021
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo
Veterinarian

Thank you for clarifying that for me.

I understand that both dogs are healthy, but have you ever happened to have any genetic testing done, like one of these products that lets you determine the ancestry of your dog?

13 Jul 2021
Customer reply
13 Jul 2021
No
13 Jul 2021
Dog Specialist's response
13 Jul 2021
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo
Veterinarian

That's okay. I was more curious than anything else.  The testing that's available these days does a remarkable job of identifying dogs who may be carriers of genes for different illnesses.

This is actually sort of a complex question, so please give me a few minutes to type in an answer.

13 Jul 2021
Dog Specialist's response
13 Jul 2021
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo
Veterinarian

I'd like to address your question about the possibility of an abortion first.

On the one hand, when a mismating occurs, the only reasonably safe option to eliminate the pregnancy is doing surgery to spay the female. Removing the ovaries and uterus will of course end the pregnancy, but also eliminates the female dog's ability to get pregnant again in the future.

Risks associated with the surgery are minimized by doing the procedure within the first week after mating occurred. That way the uterus and its blood supply haven't had time to increase yet.

It's kind of drastic to do this, but it is the only option that's available. Otherwise the dog simply has to go through with the pregnancy. In most cases, allowing the dog to go through with the pregnancy is usually the best option for the dog's well-being.

In your particular case, the time window on this option has closed. That means your only option at this point is to allow her to go through with the pregnancy.  I'm sorry to deliver what must be disappointing news, but it's important for me to be honest with you.

Please give me a moment to type information about what we can expect regarding the health of the puppies. Thank you for being patient with me.

13 Jul 2021
Dog Specialist's response
13 Jul 2021
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo
Veterinarian

First and foremost, I want to let you know that the odds are in your favor that these puppies will be completely fine.

Inbreeding like this has been commonly done throughout the history of dog breeding in order to develop and maintain certain breed characteristics and standards.

It is absolutely NOT a guarantee that all the puppies will be somehow disabled or unhealthy.

In order to understand this, you need to know a little bit about how genetics work.

Let's imagine the mother dog carries a gene for some type of illness or other bad mutation, but does not "express" it because it's recessive and she only has one copy. She would have to have two copies of the gene in order for it to affect her.

In most cases, we would expect any male child of hers to also be a carrier for this gene. Again, we would assume he would have only one copy of the gene, having received it from his mother.

When he mated with his mother, however, that makes it much more likely that at least some of their puppies would be affected whatever disease this gene causes.

So, this type of inbreeding is only potentially risky if the mother is a carrier for some sort of genetic disease.  If she's not carrying the jeans for any harmful diseases, the puppies are expected to be fine.
All of this means that a mother to son breeding is NOT a guarantee for disaster.  It just increases the odds for an unlucky genetic combination, if there is a mutation present. It's possible the puppies could all turn out just fine.

Does this make sense the way I explained it? I want to be as helpful as possible.

13 Jul 2021
Customer reply
13 Jul 2021
Ok. Thanks for all the great info and help. I appreciate it
13 Jul 2021
Dog Specialist's response
13 Jul 2021
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo

You're welcome. I will remain hopeful that everything turns out okay.

My goal is to do my best to provide you with accurate, relevant, and thorough information.  If you have more follow-up questions on this same topic, please use the REPLY box below.

If you wish to ask me a new question in the future, please feel free to add me to your favorites.  I'll look forward to assisting you again in the future.
Thank you.

-Dr. Jo

Customer rating:
Dr. Jo
Dr. Jo
Veterinarian
Avg. question only $30
DVM from Iowa State University in 1994; actively engaged in private regular and emergency practice since that time.
13 Jul 2021
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